Only three spots left at my upcoming workshop, and I’m giving a spot away to one lucky winner!

Only three spots left at my upcoming workshop, and I’m giving a spot away to one lucky winner!

As many of you know, I am teaching a couple of workshops at the Atlantis Resort in the Bahamas during the first-ever Fstoppers Workshop. At this point, there are only a few weeks left to register, and in my biggest class, ‘The Complete Guide To Architecture and Interiors Photography‘, there are only three spots left! This is exciting news – I’m really looking forward to meeting all the participants and I have a feeling that it’s going to be an incredibly fun workshop since it’s been limited size-wise to be very small and intimate.

One of the epic locations we scouted for the workshop... One of the epic locations we scouted for the workshop…

Anyway, more to the point – I’ve teamed up with Fstoppers to add a hold a last minute contest to give away a slot in my two day ‘Complete Guide To Architectural Photography’ workshop. All you have to do to enter is leave a comment here (by clicking on the post title) or on my Facebook page telling me why you shoot architecture or why you want to shoot architecture. It can make me laugh, make me cry, or just plain ‘ol be a story about how it’s always something you’ve wanted to do but never had the opportunity. It’s that simple. I’ll round up all of the comments, post a few of my favorites, and notify the winner. Yes – it’s that simple. Tell me why you want to learn how to photograph architecture or want to refine your skills, and you could win a free pass to the workshop.

Note that the pass doesn’t include airfare or hotels – but if you’re on the east coast, flights to Nassau are relatively cheap, depending on where you leave from. The rooms start at $169 a night, which is heavily discounted from their normal rates.

If you want to see some of the locations we have access to, check out the video below:

And if you’re interested in finding out what an awesome time this is going to be, take a look at the video I  made with Lee, Pat, and Lauren of Fstoppers. We had a freakin’ ball down there, and I know it’s only going to be better during the workshop. The more the merrier, right?

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Comments ( 17 )

  • Joe Loehle

    I have been a real estate photographer for some time, but am just starting to really have my eyes opened to how it should be done. I always used HDR as a fast and simple way to get it done. But it never was exactly right to me. My eyes are opened to using flashes to do it right. I am loving it but have so much more to learn about it. There are a number of issues I run into that have been overcome by watching your video. Of course, I still have a few more. I want to take it to that next level. On a personal note, Lee and Patrick photographed my wedding 5 years ago before F-stoppers was started. They were great to work with and the success they have had could not happen to nicer guys. I wish you good luck and good weather at your workshop. ~Joe Loehle

  • Hans Klett

    I am lucky enough to live in Hawaii and although there is no shortage of incredible scenery to photograph my focus is on architecture. I live 30 minutes away from 2 of the most mind blowing enclaves of outrageous wealth. Within these gated communities are an architectural photographer’s dream come true. There’s no expense spared on these homes and the imagination is the only limit as the budgets aren’t even a consideration. I have connections that can get me into most of these amazing homes and it’s up to me to document the beauty the way the owner, architect, and designer envisioned. Using this technique makes people stop in their tracks to take a closer look. I will be the most enthusiastic participant in the class. I get so much enjoyment out of shooting this way. I’ll beg and borrow for airfare and hotel but a free pass to the class would be magic.

  • Chet Meyerson

    Nothing suits my technical style of photography like shooting real estate and architecture. Besides, one can spend a lifetime and never really master it all. I would welcome the opportunity to attend your workshop.Nothing suits my technical style of photography like shooting real estate and architecture. Besides, one can spend a lifetime and never really master it all. I would welcome the opportunity to attend your workshop.

  • Radu gospodinov

    I was trying to find my niche as a photogrher uuntil i saw mike’s real estste/architecture awesome killer light paint photography. I want to try to make this work at his level. It is like a contesc with myself.

  • William Dunlap

    I’m in a market that has only a few real estate photographers. I’d like to improve my work to have it stand head and shoulders above the rest.

  • Jason Denham

    Have really enjoyed learning from your style of utilizing minimal lighting equipment, but maximizing its impact through Photoshop layers. I think this technique could apply to so many variety of subjects–cars, planes, boats, nearly anything. Would be great to learn directly from you in person.

  • Nick DeLeonardo

    Ive been looking for a way to stop doing my day job and I think architecture photography is it! Pick me! Pick Me!

  • Lori Steigerwald

    I’ve been doing some real estate photography for the past couple of years, mostly for a decorator friend. I’ve used multiple exposures, masking, etc. but after watching your tutorial, I realize I have so much more to learn. I just purchased your full on-line class because I couldn’t swing the trip. I would absolutely love to witness your technique in person. Either way, thanks so much for putting your knowledge out there. I have been searching the web for a while now for just such a course, and I am so happy to have found you! Lori

  • edward taylor

    I want to shoot architecture because I have an appreciation for beauty. I want to document and maybe even interpret another artist’s work. When the scale and proportion of an artists work appeal to me, I can feel it in my soul. Finding the proper angles and learning the skills to expose this beauty is what I want to do. Give me the opportunity to learn from you in your Architectural photography workshop.

  • tina case

    I’m so excited to find your site. I’ve been contacted to take architectural photos and have been looking at all your work. I’d love a spot in your workshop!!

  • Chris Blair

    I love shooting architecture! It never tells me "no I wont strip" or " are you really even a photographer?" Capturing long lines that seem to travel into the sky or seeing night shots that could only exist with the help of a super long exposure are what it’s all about for me.

  • Mark Valentino

    i work for a multifamily architect and we have a had time getting good photos of the outside of our larger buildings. I do photos for a kitchen and bath contractor locally and i just cant get my pictures to have the "punch" that your photos have and would love to learn the technique both behind the camera and computer.

  • Trish Scelfo

    I’m attracted to lines and angles and light and shadow. Architectural photography allows me to play with those elements. I love how even tiny changes in any one of those can change the whole feel of the image and the viewers perception of the space. I’d love to learn more and really master this genre.

  • Trish Scelfo

    I’m attracted to lines and angles and light and shadow. Architectural photography allows me to play with those elements. I love how even tiny changes in any one of those can change the whole feel of the image and the viewers perception of the space. I’d love to learn more and really master this genre.

  • Michael Mellon

    Well, unlike most of the people posting here, I am NOT a professional architectural shooter. I am still assisting. I work at an advertising studio in Milwaukee, WI. I first went to school to study graphic design at the Illinois Institute of Art in Chicago. Fast forward about 6 years and I now have a degree in Photography. I worked full time on 3rd shift while attending school for 8-10 hours a day, 4/5 days a week. All while dealing with the obstacles of being a new father. I’ve always been drawn to architecture photograph because of the design elements. A lot of what I learned in graphic design can be seen in architecture. Things like shape, pattern, line, balance, proportion, contrast, texture, color and so on. I’m naturally drawn to these "principles of design" which is why I enjoy architectural photography so much. I purchased your video and I love it. You take it down to the bare essentials so anyone with a camera and speedlite can get into this realm of photography. I do want to learn more and start putting together a portfolio of interiors and exteriors. Having a steady paycheck is nice. Especially with kids and a mortgage. But I’m just not cut out for the 9-5 job, even though it is in my field. I was freelance for a little over 3 years before I took this position back in October. I loved every minute of it. I believe the time has come for me to step out of the assisting world, and start shooting for myself.

  • Preston Keller

    Hi Michael. First of all, thank you very much for this opportunity! I love your Iceland series and will be the first one in line to buy your fine art book when it comes out. My wife and I did the amazing Landmannalaugar trek (50km over 4 days) last August during an extended stopover on the way to Holland to visit her family. I have been taking architectural photographs in Holland with the theme of capturing how the contemporary styles relate to the historical over our last couple trips there and hope to compile a book at some point as well (we fly there every other year). I commented on your facebook post first but only explained where I’m coming from so I wanted to add the above after seeing your Iceland gallery here! Here is a reprint of the facebook post:

    I graduated from architecture school at Syracuse 5 years ago and have since worked in Boston on a high school, some commercial office fit-outs, and for the last 2 years a high rise luxury apartment building. Photography has always been a passion of mine and naturally architecture is my chosen subject matter. When the professional photos came back after my first project (the high school) I was extremely frustrated with the results. They were technically competent (verticals corrected, no blown out highlights, etc.) but he just didn’t understand how the spaces worked and how to compose a shot that highlighted the architectural features. I work all the time in choosing camera views for rendering our 3d models and this experience has greatly improved my composition in architectural photography. Please choose me so that I can learn all the other digital (compositing, lighting, etc.) and business skills needed to become a professional! Thanks for giving us this opportunity to learn from you in a wonderful location and atmosphere!

  • Trina Knudsen

    I wish I had found this a month and a half ago. Your work is incredible and the topics described in your workshop video are spot-on what I have been searching to learn (which is why I finally ran across the Fstoppers Workshop and your blog). Hoping you will teach these workshops again so I can attend. In my portrait and wedding work, I have always been drawn to architectural components and a couple years ago started to focus more exclusively on photographing architecture. Eager student – let me know when you plan your next workshops. Have a blast in the Bahamas!

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